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Mary Amelia Faison

(b. 1831)

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At a Glance

Mary Amelia Faison, always called Amelia, was the ninth child of William A. Faison and Susan Moseley Faison. She was therefore the younger sister of Eliza Ann Faison who married Patrick Murphy, Esq. She was consequently the aunt of Eliza's twins: Mary Bailey Murphy  and Susan Moseley Murphy  [1].

Story

As her father was a wealthy planter of Sampson County, NC, Amelia was in no sense a pensioner of the Murphy family into which her sister had married. Amelia was only three years older than her nieces, though, so it is likely that her older sister Eliza Ann Faison thought of her as a youthful chaperone for the girls.

Amelia entered the Burwell School the same time as the other girls from the Cuwhiffle Plantation in Sampson County, NC (the Murphy estate) and the surrounding area. This circle included her two twin nieces, Julia Murphy , and Sarah Grice . They all began in the fall term of 1848 (which started on July 17) and presumably stayed two years. Amelia is frequently mentioned in letters her twin nieces wrote home.

At the age of twenty, Amelia married John Gillespie McDougald. While there seems to be no record of the termination of their marriage, Amelia married again only seven years later. This time she married a Presbyterian minister, Dr. B. F. Marable. The couple had two daughters. The first, Sula Marable, died as a young woman, while Belle Marable went on to marry a man by the name of [Unknown] Dean and have children of her own: Christine Dean, Marable Dean, Carlton Dean, Dorothy Dean, Gladys Dean, and David Dean.

There seems to be no record of when Amelia died or where she is buried [1].

Biographical Data

Mary was called Amelia.

Important Dates

Mary Amelia Faison was born on March 5, 1831.

Places of Residence

Schools Attended

Relatives

References

  1. Mary Claire Engstrom. The Book of Burwell Students: Lives of Educated Women in the Antebellum South. (Hillsborough: Hillsborough Historic Commission, 2007).